Tuesday, March 30, 2010

English

I was just listening to um, what was it called? Word of Mouth, maybe? It was on Radio 4 anyway (so it must be right).

According to the professor on it, the idea that nouns are objects, verbs are doing words, and adjectives are qualifiers, was an outdated Roman-derived theory that isn't true. I think that's what he said.

He - or another expert on the programme - also said that Fowler (of Fowler's Modern English Usage) didn't object to sentences ending with a preposition and that Strunk & White's Elements of Style, beloved by Americans, is full of errors.

My world is so shaken that I've had to stop ironing and come and sit down.

5 comments:

Amanda said...

erm......

CalumCarr said...

What on earth is that professor talking about?

Can I share your seat?

NitWit1 said...

Well don't be too shaken. Americans slaughter pure English, not the least of which is unbiquitous sentence ending in a preposition.

I have primer of style from my high school English teacher, but doubt it is anywhere near the current thought on proper language.

Rose said...

Now they've changed the parts of speech?? Good grief, I might as well throw away my college diploma. Good thing I'm retired:)

katney said...

My concern over the language is that when we visit the UK this summer we won't be able to understand the natives--especialy in Scotland, but maybe if we get to Wales as well. Though I also remember years ago standing open-mouthed as a friend had to interpret for a Londoner who gave us directions. (I'd done that in Germany, Italy, and Spain.)